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20121224
20130101
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KQED (PBS) 38
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English 38
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
by these funders. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> charlie: charles dickens the great british writer was born in 1812. his 200th birthday is being celebrated including at new york's morgan library. >> on assignment for charlie rose at new york's museum of library and museum. peepierpont morgan was an averae collector of dickens. the museum holds the largest collection in america. we are joined by dr. the curator and department head of literacy and historical manuscripts at the morgan library. >> here we are in mr. morgan's study. we're looking at the first installments of david copperfield. one schilling would have got you your monthly part. and here is the beginning part of the booklets and it is just page after page after page of advertisements for books and pills and remedies and all kinds of things. here you have the original illustrations that accompany each part separated by tissue, of course, so they didn't smudge each other. here's the very first page of the narrative, whether i turn out to be the hero of my own life
of a glorious past. and some parts of the city bustle with holiday energy. but not far away: closed-up storefronts. and, further below the surface, this: a health clinic set up by the greek branch of the international aid group, doctors of the world to serve the country's newly poor. dr. nikitis kanakis is its director. >> brown: kanakis group, in fact, had to cut back some of its work in africa because of the needs at home. here in perama, unemployment tops 50% as the shrinking economy has crippled much of the local shipping industry. at the same time, the deeply indebted greek government has made dramatic budget cuts, including to health benefits. the combination has left many here without access to private or public care. and that's meant a stunning rise in disease and mortality rates. >> brown: economists, of course, speak of a different kind of necessary medicine: the kind a deeply indebted nation must take. the price for living and consuming well beyond its means for far too long. >> the medicine is necessary. it was, though, delivered very abruptly. >> brown: as a government
, the world's oldest city is another place that people visit. there is obviously east jerusalem and the old city. one of the things he was saying that he might push in the future is walking, hiking, that sort of thing, activity holidays. >> all right, from manger square, thank you very much indeed. we will just show you briefly these pictures from the midnight mass. in many parts of the world, the 24th, the night before christmas really is the most important holy day of the year, and we can take you now to the vatican. pope benedict is holding a midnight mass at st. peter's basilica in the vatican. it is not yet midnight in italy, but because of the pope's health and to give him time to rest before he delivers the christmas day message, this year, the ceremony began at 9:00 gmt, and that would be 10:00 in italy, which was just about one hour ago. the pope conducting this mess and also lighting the candle of peace, which he did earlier and put on the balcony of his apartment window, which overlooks st. peter's square. this is one of the largest churches anywhere in the world. there are touri
into gangs of killing and destruction. the army has destroyed cities and towns. it has committed massacres against our people, who took to the streets to demand freedom. long live syria, free and europe. >> he also defected from the bashar al-assad government. before that he held several high-ranking posts including the ambassador to sweden. i asked him how significant it is. >> it is very significant because one of the highest- ranking officers that have affected so far, and this man is the head of the military police and he must know a lot of things that have been going on by the army, invading the cities and killing civilians and bombarding the area with chemical weapons. he has said homs was bombed with chemical weapons. this is his statement. i think he was in a position to do this because you have all the reports coming to him. >> is it really that significant given that bashar al-assad still can count the military in multiples of tens of thousands? he is getting help from the russians, the iranians, and also has fallen out of lebanon. he looks pretty secure and appears to be acting
in the previous year. one man knows a lot about that subject, new york city's deputy police commissioner, paul brown, who joins us live right now. mr. brown, congratulations. how have you done it? >> thank you, mainly through 35,000 men and women in uniform, but particularly through something called operation at attack where we send as many uniformed police officers as possible into areas where we have seen spikes and violence, particularly shootings. >> that sounds almost like a back to basics campaign. why was the decision taken to go in that direction? >> well, it started with mayor bloomberg and commissioner kelly coming into the office right after 9/11 with a deep downturn in the economy, less tax revenue. we lost 6000 police officers through attrition, we have 6000 fewer now than we had then. that forced us to take a look at how we deploy officers into the city. instead of dividing them up as we usually did into 76 precincts, we focused better on defining exactly where the most violent crimes were happening and putting the biggest number of officers there, the biggest bang for the block.
communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: let me start off. tell me what makes -- what makes a great restaurant? how do you -- >> well, what makes a great restaurant i don't know exactly. a great restaurant i think is where the owner and the chef gives all the love he can. >> rose: when does your day start? >> ooh, sometimes 8:00, sometimes 9:00, sometimes 7:00. >> rose: what's the first thing you do? >> oh, it changes a little bit. i stop at the office for 15 minutes and then i go down and look if everything is holding and look -- >> rose: see i had this impression of all of you at the fish market at 4:00 a.m. everyday saying "these are the finest and the freshest" and you're poring over the fish, picking them up and deciding "only this is good enough for my customers, my clientele." >> oh, of course, we are a very aware and we do buy the best and i think what makes a great rest vaunt the cooking also. of course the service, the ambience, and for that we buy the best, we don't wake up at 4:00 in the morning because we finished at midnight every night. but
. >> woodruff: from boston, hari sreenivasan reports on a city- wide effort to keep kids engaged in education through meaningful work experiences. >> we're starting at the very early ages to try to help young people speak. that is a direct relationship to being successful in school and being successful in your life >> woodruff: and we close out 2012 with two takes on history, first, a look at the emancipation proclamation on the eve of the 150th anniversary of president lincoln's action to end slavery and the civil war. >> woodruff: plus michael beschloss and richard norton smith talk about potential historical turning points of the past year. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station
am stimulated to right by the turmoil of the city, by the confusion and problems, but i am also nearest by the solitude, the closest to the nature region the closeness to nature. people say, what does wilderness mean when you are starving? i get that, but i also does not mean to destroy the wilderness, because when you are not starving you are going to want a place to go and your kids and grandkids are going to want a place to go, so i see it as my responsibility to take care of the problems in the city, but to take care of the wilderness for future generations. we have to. tavis: the love you have given is boundless, and i am glad to have you on this program. this is so unfair to have our life so rich you cannot even scratched the surface. there is a book you can pick up. it is called "a natural woman, written by the one and only carole king. the timing of this is a beautiful thing. it is on the new york times best-seller list. i really do love this. i love you. >> i love you, sue. thank you for your work. i really appreciate you. tavis: it is a love fest. that is our show for
fragments remains. it came down close to the city of shymkent. >> a plane has crash landed on a road in burma. two died and 11 were injured when the aircraft came down three kilometers short of its intended destination. here is our report. >> a burned-out shell now lying in a field. this was an aircraft flying an internal route popular with terrorists. the plane crashed into a rice field just before 9:00 a.m. local time. it was en route from the old capital to heho, which is the gateway place to the lake. one of the passengers told the bbc how they circled the airport before they tried to land. >> we went in those clouds, and suddenly we crashed. we just hit the ground, and then it was all red, and orange, and smoke came. then we saw some fire. then the steward he is opened the emergency exit. we thought it better to get out as soon as possible before it might explode. >> there had been 65 passengers and six crew on board. investigators are trying to determine the exact cause of the crash. some reports suggest an engine fire. the fatalities include a motor cyclist on the ground. the
no good. -- kylie minogue. 7 tons of fireworks filled the air above sydney harbour bridge. this city's style is rather different. john yang has held what for help -- it's believed to be the first public new year celebration in north korea. burma has joined the global party. ♪ >> the end of the year would not be complete without the viral pop hit, "gangnam style" being performed with great enthusiasm. while hong kong celebrate with a virtuous so show over victoria harbor. fireworks lit up moscow's red square. in dubai, they filmed the midnight moment under the world's tallest building. the gulf states is eager to take its place among the world's best known venues for the dawn of the new year. >> no happy new year in syria. the situation is as great as ever. the bodies of 30 people found with signs of torture in a suburb of damascus. the international peace negotiator of syria urged to push for peace talks between the government and rebels. the country could become a failed state ruled by warlords. in iraq, a wave of attacks killed nearly 23 people and injured more than 80 as a car b
, but in silicon valley, the highly anticipated facebook ipo fell flat. the city of stockton made headlines as the largest city in the u.s. to ever file for bankruptcy. and a deadly shooting at oikos university in oakland left seven people dead and a community in shock. and obama care was given the seal of approval by the u.s. supreme court, now poised to take on prop 8 and the defense of marriage act. california's high-speed rail stayed on track but just barely. the controversial bullet train came under fire from many sides with funding still in question. the state parks were saved from closing but suffered another setback when an unused surplus of millions of dollars was discovered sitting in a secret account. and there was also excitement. the golden gate bridge celebrated its 75th anniversary, and a new bay bridge neared completion. the mars curiosity captured our attention and imagination, turning thoughts to the possibility of life on other planets. and with their backs against the wall, the san francisco giants refused to die, bringing home their second world series championship in t
urban cities, 50% of the kids are dropping out. almost every large urban district is dysfunctional. philadelphia is at the highest level of dysfunction. there was a need to engage students. the normal curriculum is boring, and kids are disinterested. today what we are going to do, the first thing is we are going to move the gt over here. all right? ready-- one, two, three. so, the evx team is an afterschool program. we build and design hybrid and electric vehicles. we had success the very first year. the students won the local science fair which was a first for... for students from west philadelphia high school. from there, it just organically grew. >> here, put it over here. the mission of the evx team this year is to be serious competitors in the automotive x prize. the automotive x prize is a $10 million competition that's invited teams from around the world to develop viable vehicles that get over 100 miles per gallon. we're the only high school in the world that has thrown our hat in the ring. >> to all the other teams in the x prize competition, you are going to lose. >> you
captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: master ricardo muti is here, one of the world's great conductors. he has lead some of the best orchestras including the vienna philharmonic, he is currently music director of the chicago symphony orchestra, critics and audiences alike have been dazzled and charmed by the intensity, the technique, the emotion that he and his musicians bring. here is a look at a performance of verdi's requiem. >> when you look at the journey of your life, from the violin, piano, goesing, conducting, is that the perfect sign of flow for someone who wants to lead a great orchestra? >> first i didn't want to be a musician. so the first quality, i mean the first, if you don't want something and you get it. and but i studied very seriously but fortunately-- . >> rose: what did you want to be, do. >> first my father was a medical doctor. we are five brothers. and he wanted one to be a doctor, one to be an architect, one to-- my profession was opposed to become a lawyer, that would have been a disast
city talks adopted today inviting opposition to start identifying areas where we can agree how to amend that constitution. >> ifill: the opposition has lost every battle that it has had against the president since he took over last june, are you two fractured, do you owe pose him? >> we have been fractured in the past. don't forget that after the uprising, after the revolution, the brotherhood has been underground for 780 years, it has been reaching out to the grass roots providing social services. they have excellent connection with average joe, if you like. opposition has been six months old. has been established in the last few months has been fractured. right now i think only in last month we had been getting together, establishing a united front. i think we're moving -- gaining ground right now. if you compare referendum a year and a half ago we've got 23%. this time we got 36%. we do hope that as the coming parliamentary election we can get majority. if we do that we finally would be able to correct the past of the revolution that focused on human dignity guarantees of freedom.
community programs in nevada city, which provides services for the county's mentally ill, including those who fall under laura's law, and many who don't. some of the patients, like 36- year-old jonathan maurer-- here for a long acting injection for his paranoid schizophrenia, and to meet with a psychiatrist-- resent being ordered to receive treatment. today maurer accepts voluntary treatment, for his paranoia; though he claims to have been mistreated previously. >> they gave me a catheter, and strapped me down naked on the hospital bed and then sedated me. they strip you of all your rights. i just don't see how they expect to logically assume that treating people with violence is going to cure violence. >> reporter: but debra simmons-- mother of a very disturbed son who gets treatment here-- praises laura's law and involuntary treatment for essentially saving his life. she didn't want his name used. >> he gets angry and agitated, doesn't sleep, doesn't eat, just goes through a whole cycle of events that just kind of spiral downward until he's become a concern to the society if he's out in
is the central city landmark of india, that happened on a sunday, it did have the effect of creating a cat and mouse, a game between the police. the protestors were extremely angry for example that no one from the government had come out to address them on the saturday when they had been tear gassed and water canonned as they approached the president's residence. sos there a sense of a government that was tone deaf and wasn't hearing the people. and that just made them more enraged. so in many ways it was an invitation for them to come back. so yes, the crackdown not only angered people but i think generated a lot of heat, that said, on sunday, which were the especially violent, especially violent protests, the numbers were a lot fewer. >> suarez: well, you talk about tone deaf politicians, have the nation's leaders heard the protestors now. are they responding in a different way? >> well, they're trying. the government has responded with what many governments often respond to in crisis management situation, commissions and inquiry, emotions are running very high and the call for capital p
a hot drink. many have complained that very often these shelters on and on the outskirts of major cities of sometimes too hard to find. >> you need to take a bus to get there but i don't have any money to pay for my fair. i don't think i would be better off there. >> many homeless ukrainians will have to spend the new year holiday in these temporary shelters. according to weather forecasts, if a bit warmer in the ukraine in january. >> an ambitious mission to drill through 3 kilometers of antarctic ice has been cut short. they aimed to explore a lake that had been hidden for half a million years. the project to find hints of simple life existing in these extreme conditions. however, they failed and the team was forced to abandon the project. >> this is science at his toughest into this video from the british and arctic survey shows that backbreaking effort by 12 scientists and engineers trying to drill through the ice. with bare hands on steel, the mission depended on hot water being blasted down into the ice to open the routes to an ancient lake. from a tiny camp on the ice, it was to e
and eventually cities. if lawmakers fail to reach a deal before january 1, the cliff's across the board spending cuts and tax increases will impact how much money states get from the federal government. ruben ramirez reports from washington. >> reporter: we all know the numbers. failing to reach a deal by january 1 will result in $109 billion in automatic cuts to federal spending. and while that's a big number, what matters most to states and municipalities is the small print, detailing just where those cuts will happen. and standard & poors' gabe pettek says those details could still be months away. >> even if the policymakers in washington, d.c., resolve the immediate issue before january 1 or shortly thereafter, we think there are going to be several details related to the administration of tax policy and the way the federal government spends money that will have an important effect on state budgets. >> reporter: the pew center on the states reports around 18% of federal grants to states would be subject to sequestration's spending cuts. that works out to about $7.5 billion the states could u
expectations. looking at month over month performance, the 20 city index fell 0.1% from september to october. still, s&p is optimistic about housing activity in the new year. >> 2013 should be a good year for housing, we're going into the year with a whole lot of momentum, we've seen very strong housing starts, very strong construction in 2012 but even with that strength construction is still way below where it should be and we have a lot of lost ground to make up. >> susie: david blitzer also expects home prices to continue to improve through the end of next year, and he believes that rebound in prices will help the u.s. economic recovery. still ahead, the outlook for stocks in 2013, we're joined by wayne kaufman, he's the chief market analyst at john thomas financial. president obama is due back in washington tomorrow, cutting short his hawaiian holiday vacation. he will be meeting with congressional leaders for one last push to prevent the economy from falling over the fiscal cliff next week. no specific bill is on the schedule in the senate or the house, and house republicans haven't yet
? an elementary school student near salt lake city brought a gun to school saying he wanted to protect his friends. instead, he allegedly used it to threaten his classmates. as the good book say, get with it. train up a child, and when he is old, he will not depart for it. ready, aim, fire. for the child who has everything this season, how about body armor? a utah company named amendment two offers a new line of it for kids. mother jones magazine reports sales have tripled in one week. a massachusetts company is promoting the bullet blocker, a rugged computer backpack designed for work or play, made of the same materials used in bulletproof police vests currently on sale for the holidays for $199.99. on facebook, an outfit called black dragon tactical that sells vests and other combat gear sent this message. arm the teachers. in the meantime, bulletproof the kids. this market never closes. america's turned violence into a profit center. if you haven't finished your christmas shopping, no need to wait for santa. his sleigh couldn't even hold the heavy weapons. step this way. black friday is every d
by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: les miserables is one of the best loved muse calls of all time, 60 million people have gone to see victor hugo 1862 novel of tragedy, romance and revolution sung into life it is now one of the year's most anticipated movies. here is the trailer for the film. ♪ i dreamed a dream in time gone by ♪ ♪ and hope was high, life worth living ♪ ♪ i dreamed that love would never die ♪ ♪ i dreamed that god would be forgiving ♪ ♪ but the tigers come at night ♪ ♪ thunder ♪ i had a dream my life would be ♪ ♪ no different from the tale i'm living ♪ ♪ no different now from what it seemed ♪ ♪ a life has killed a dream i dreamed ♪ ♪. >> rose: joining me now is the director tom hooper, his last movie the king's speech won an oscar for best picture. also with us anne hathaway. she brings new grit and passion to the role of the tragic heroine and hugh jack mann jean valjean. i'm pleased to have all of them back at this table. welcome. >> thank you. >> how hard is it to take this k
the country's head of border security.ll the russian-made aircraft went down near the southern city of shymkent. the dead also included seven crew members and 19 border guards. there was no immediate word on the cause of the crash, but kazakhstan has been plagued by heavy winds and snow in recent weeks. the long-time actor charles durning died monday at his home in new york. he came to be known as the "king of the character actors" in a 50-year career that spanned 5 broadway, the movies and television. along the way, he earned two oscar nominations. one was for his role as the corrupt governor in "the best little whorehouse in texas" in 1982. i and in "tootsie," he played the9 unwitting suitor of dustin hoffman, who was posing as a female soap opera star. charles durning was 89 years old. those are some of the day's major stories. a now, back to gwen. >> ifill: we turn to politics and part two of our look at upcoming elections.>g last night, i talked with newshour political editor christina bellantoni and shira toeplitz of roll call about hot senate contests. tonight, we continue ou
sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: andy warhol is considered by many to be the most important artist of the 21st century, though critics and artist debate the meaning of his work, few question his impact on contemporary art. this is the subject of of the metropolitan musician exhibition called "regarding warhol: 60 artists, 50 years." it showcases 45 works by warhol alongside 1200 works by 60 other artists influenced by him. joining me are two curators, mark rosenthal and marla prather. also are three of the artists featured in the show: jeff koons john currin and my good friend chuck close. i'm pleased to have all of them here at this table. let me start with you, mark. somebody once said to me great books begin with a question. do great exhibitions begin with a question? >> well, that's what i hope. the question here is, is andy warhol the most impactful artist? >> rose: impactful rather than important? >> i prefer that. i prefer that because i think of his effect being like a meteor hitting the earth and changing climact
security. the russian-made aircraft went down near a southern city. the dead also included seven crew members and 19 border guards. there was no immediate word on the cause of the crash but kazakhstan has been plagued by heavy winds and snow in recent weeks. the long-time actor charles durning died monday at his home in new york. he came to be known as the king of character actors. in a 50-year career that spanned broadway, the movies and television. along the way he earned two oscar nominations. one was for his role as the corrupt governor in the best little whorehouse in texas in 1992. in tootsies he played the suitor of dustin hoffman who was posing as a female soap opera star. now back to gwen. >> ifill: we turn to politics and part 2 of our lookality upcoming elections. last night i had talkd with newshour political editor christina bellantoni about how senate contests. tonight we continue our conversation. welcome. let's talk some more politics. i want to start with illinois where jesse jackson, jr. who just resigned his house seat has left a wide ownen political fight in his wa
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)